About NCAPIP


The National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians (NCAPIP) represents Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander physicians committed to the advancement of the health and well-being of their patients and communities. NCAPIP believes in shaping health care in America to meet this shared American goal of optimal health for all.

Physicians must take a leadership role in assuring that every American receives the highest quality health care, provided by health care systems and supported by health care policies that value each and every individual and their unique backgrounds. Health care should be provided in an equitable manner, without discrimination based on type of health insurance, income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, national origin, language, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, geographic location, or immigration status.

NCAPIP recognizes the important policy gains implemented by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and supports additional national, state, local, and health care industry-driven policy reforms that will address the disparities AANHPI populations face, and which would improve the health care systems in the U.S. for all. To achieve optimal health for all, federal, state, local, and health care industry policies, standards, and practices must address:
  1. affordable access to care that is not only affordable health insurance coverage, but also overcoming cultural and linguistic barriers to care;
  2. improved quality of care, a must for all Americans, with consideration given to the socioeconomic conditions, diversity of needs, and health disparities experienced by AANHPIs;
  3. reduced costs and payment reform with continued innovation, and intentional shift of resources to prevention and wellness, primary care, and home- and community based care; and
  4. health workforce development and leadership.

"Why Do South Asians Have Such High Rates of Heart Disease?"

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NCAPIP Board Member Dr. Alka Kanaya is featured in this New York Times article, "Why Do South Asians Have Such High Rates of Heart Disease?" Dr. Kanaya is Principal Investigator of the MASALA study, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to determine risk factors for subclinical atherosclerosis among South Asian Americans and the study on Restorative yoga vs. stretching for adults with metabolic syndrome (PRYSMS study).

The Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in the America (MASALA) Study uses a similar design and measures from the national MESA study (with over 6,800 White, African American, Latino and Chinese American participants from 2000­2007). There are 900 South Asian participants in the MASALA study, enrolled through the University of California San Francisco and Northwestern University. While the South Asians in the MASALA study were less likely to be smokers and drank less alcohol compared to the participants in the MESA study, the South Asians had significantly lower levels of exercise and physical activity.

Is Your Practice MIPS Ready? Connect with Resources to Help Your Practice

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NCAPIP has partnered with HCDI Support Alignment Network to help you understand the changes to The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA). Click here to learn more about changes to the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and the various alternative payment models (APMs) now available to you. Learn more on the HCDI Support Alignment Network's page on MACRA, where you will be able to connect with experts on MIPS and quality improvement.

HCDI Support Alignment Network
The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA)
Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS)
Alternative Payment Models (APMs)

Precision Medicine and AANHPI: Not to be Left Out

As part of our work with the NIH led All of Us Research Program, we created a document that explains the concept of precision medicine to providers who serve Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander patients, putting into context the importance of taking advantage of opportunities to increase the number of AANHPI in research, and obtain the data needed to tailor treatments and prevention efforts to individual patients and improve community health.

Download the statement here: What Does Precision Medicine Mean for AANHPI Patients and Providers? (PDF 239 KB)

NCAPIP Pledges to Stop Opioid Addiction Crisis

As part of the Transforming Clinical Practice Medication Management and Opioid Initiative, NCAPIP joins its partner at TCPI HCDI in pledging to uphold and support evidenced based compassionate practices and interventions for those addicted to opioids. As doctors, it's our responsibility to stay informed and be able to offer good information to our patients and colleagues. Take the MMO Pledge here: https://www.healthcarecommunities.org/Home/MMOPledge/MMOPledgeForm.aspx

Screen at 23 Campaign

Appropriate testing for Asian Americans would reveal hundreds of thousands of diabetes and pre diabetes patients.

More than half of Asian Americans with type 2 diabetes, and even more with prediabetes, are undiagnosed; there isn’t enough awareness among patients and providers of this appropriate guideline. To treat, intervene, and even prevent diabetes, we need to first ensure that it is revealed. That means making doctors and patients aware that a body mass index of 23 is a risk factor to consider for screening diabetes in an Asian American patient.

If we can make doctors and patients aware of the need to Screen at 23, we can make that happen. Go to Screenat23.org to download the Screen at 23 package and join the campaign today.

Hawaii Screen at 23 Resolution
California Screen at 23 Resolution

NCAPIP CLAS Toolkit

NCAPIP's CLAS Toolkit will be made available to health providers soon! An excerpt is available here: NCAPIP CLAS Toolkit

CLAS in the Workforce - Cultural and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health Care

The CLAS Toolkit for Small and Solo Practice Providers

The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health (the National CLAS Standards, or, just CLAS), were created to advance health equity and help eliminate health disparities by providing a blueprint for health and healthcare organizations to:

(Principle Standard) Provide care that is optimized for all people and populations and doesn’t lose effectiveness.

Workforce (At all levels): Have a diverse, representative workforce - from governance and leadership to staff on the ground - that promotes CLAS, cares about CLAS, and continually educates itself on CLAS.

Communication: Provide high quality in-language assistance and materials, from interpreters to written and auditory materials, tuned to all patients, and make sure patients are informed that this assistance is readily available.

Internal Engagement, Improvement and Accountability: Establish in-house CLAS goals and make them align with existing improvement efforts, using collected population data to monitor progress.

External Engagement Improvement and Accountability: Assess community needs and tune the CLAS improvements accordingly, give the community itself a voice in these efforts, create a resolution process that speaks to the community when things go wrong, and talk with the public about CLAS efforts.
We have created a presentation that explains the NCAPIP project on CLAS and how it helps raise awareness of CLAS among providers, as well as offering tools and resources to help them utilize CLAS and achieve recognition for the culturally and linguistically appropriate services they are already rendering.

Download the presentation: National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care and the Medical Community (PDF 5.3 MB)